Frost & Sullivan determines a real and urgent need for novel cancer diagnostics tests

Nucleic acid based tests address the need for tests that aid in the early detection and prevention of cancer

06-Feb-2013 - United Kingdom

The range of potential therapeutic approaches available to treat cancer is expected to expand rapidly during the next decade. Current diagnostic technologies focus on detection and diagnosis of cancer using mainly blood, faeces, urine tests or genetic tests. Testing methods are now gradually moving towards targeted treatment with the help of companion diagnostics, which help track disease progress, enabling patients to be treated with appropriate drugs.

New analysis from Frost & Sullivan,  Western European In Vitro cancer diagnostics Market, finds that the market earned revenues of $736.0 million in 2011 and estimates this to reach $1519.8 million in 2019. The research covers immunoassay, immunohistochemistry, nucleic acid testing (NAT), clinical chemistry and other diagnostic methods.

The growing prevalence of cancer, together with greater patient awareness, will drive test volumes. Despite falling prices, the massive increase in test volumes will keep the market on an upward trajectory.

“The projected launch of new NAT products for cancer diagnosis will result in high growth rates and revenue generation in this segment,” notes Frost & Sullivan Senior Research Analyst Divyaa Ravishankar. “NAT products have the ability to determine the predisposition of the disease condition. They address the need for diagnostic tests that aid in the early detection and prevention of cancer.”

This is in keeping with the current focus on characterising cancer in an asymptomatic phase or in a predisposition phase. Substantial research is being undertaken in Western Europe to validate the use of biomarkers in cancer detection. Biomarkers and associated techniques are set to play an increasingly important role in the development of oncology therapeutics.

While these are positive signs, consolidation has increased the bargaining power of laboratories, allowing them to squeeze the prices of cancer-related tests. The demand is now for high-capacity, high-volume laboratory solutions, rather than high-value, labour-intensive tests like NAT.

“On the one hand, efforts will have to be made to facilitate the integration of novel NAT technologies with existing laboratory systems,” advises Divyaa Ravishankar. “On the other hand, the development of innovative and more accurate tests, paralleled by initiatives at improving patient awareness about these new options, could create a ‘pull’ effect from patients, which could negate the increasing bargaining power of the centralised lab.”

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Topic world Diagnostics

Diagnostics is at the heart of modern medicine and forms a crucial interface between research and patient care in the biotech and pharmaceutical industries. It not only enables early detection and monitoring of disease, but also plays a central role in individualized medicine by enabling targeted therapies based on an individual's genetic and molecular signature.

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Topic world Diagnostics

Topic world Diagnostics

Diagnostics is at the heart of modern medicine and forms a crucial interface between research and patient care in the biotech and pharmaceutical industries. It not only enables early detection and monitoring of disease, but also plays a central role in individualized medicine by enabling targeted therapies based on an individual's genetic and molecular signature.