Dyax Issued Fifth U.S. Patent in Its Phage Display Patent Portfolio

12-Jan-2006

Dyax Corp. announced that the United States Patent and Trademark office issued U.S. Patent No. 6,979,538, Dyax's fifth U.S. patent covering its proprietary Phage Display technology. This new patent provides Dyax with additional patent claims that cover methods for displaying antibodies on filamentous bacteriophage. In addition to its five U.S. patents, Dyax holds several issued patents for Phage Display in Canada and Israel, with pending applications in other countries.

"This recently issued patent adds to Dyax's already dominant patent position in the phage display field. Our discovery technology platform continues to provide Dyax and our collaborators the ability to take almost any target of interest and identify novel compounds that selectively bind to it," said Ivana Magovcevic-Liebisch, General Counsel and Executive Vice President, Corporate Communications of Dyax Corp. "For example, our human antibody phage display libraries can be screened against a selected target to identify high-affinity antibodies that can be developed as new therapeutics."

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Antibodies are specialized molecules of our immune system that can specifically recognize and neutralize pathogens or foreign substances. Antibody research in biotech and pharma has recognized this natural defense potential and is working intensively to make it therapeutically useful. From monoclonal antibodies used against cancer or autoimmune diseases to antibody-drug conjugates that specifically transport drugs to disease cells - the possibilities are enormous

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Topic world Antibodies

Antibodies are specialized molecules of our immune system that can specifically recognize and neutralize pathogens or foreign substances. Antibody research in biotech and pharma has recognized this natural defense potential and is working intensively to make it therapeutically useful. From monoclonal antibodies used against cancer or autoimmune diseases to antibody-drug conjugates that specifically transport drugs to disease cells - the possibilities are enormous