29-Nov-2017 - Analytik Jena GmbH

Analytik Jena and BAM agree to cooperate in research

The Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, BAM) and Analytik Jena AG have agreed to cooperate extensively in the research and development of optical spectrometry in the area of elemental analysis. The two parties signed a corresponding cooperation agreement last week in Berlin.

The focus of the two partners’ future research efforts will be on the development of new devices and applications for element determination. In this connection, the teams will work jointly on the further development of the principles and methods of high-resolution absorption spectrometry in order to determine ultratrace concentrations of atoms and molecules.

“Within the framework of our research activities, it is important to us to network closely with partners from the scientific and user community and to involve these partners early on in the process of developing and implementing ideas,” says Ulrich Krauss, CEO of Analytik Jena AG. “We want to develop marketable products from a knowledge and transfer network consisting of clients in collaboration with partners from research institutes.”

BAM President Prof. Ulrich Panne elaborates: “We are pleased to be able to refine analysis using High-Resolution Continuum Source AAS (HR-CS AAS) technology in joint research with Analytik Jena AG. This approach also offers wide-ranging opportunities for our up-and-coming scientific talent.”

Facts, background information, dossiers
  • BAM
  • Analytik Jena
  • materials testing
  • research collaborations
  • collaborations
More about Analytik Jena
More about BAM
  • News

    Glowing nanocrystals

    Tiny luminous particles are being used in more and more products today: from smartphones to OLED televisions to car headlights. Precise knowledge of the luminosity is crucial for industry. The Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM) is developing reliable measurement meth ... more

    Aviation safety: Rapid test for harmful microbes in kerosene developed

    Fuels such as kerosene or diesel can be contaminated by fungi or bacteria. The microorganisms settle in the liquid itself, on the inner walls of tanks and pipes or in fuel filters and feed on carbon atoms. Since the fungi and bacteria multiply well in this environment, they can form a strea ... more

    How good is the measurement method?

    The causes of accidents can be diverse, whether it is an explosion in a chemical plant or a fire on a dangerous goods freighter. Prevention starts in the laboratory where chemicals are tested for their hazardous properties. Safety experts, haulage contractors or traders must be able to rely ... more