The Nobel Prize Winners 2017

Internal clock, gravitational waves and cold analysis

04-Oct-2017

Rainer Weiss: Michael Hauser, Barry C. Barish: R. Hahn, Kip S. Thorne: Keenan Pepper; Wikimedia Commons; pixabay.com

Rainer Weiss (left), Barry C. Barrish (center) and Kip S. Thorne (right) - Nobel Prize laureates in Physics 2017

Karolinska Institut & pixabay.com

Jeffrey C. Hall (left), Michael Rosbash (center) and Michael W. Young (right) - Nobel Prize laureates in Physiology or Medicine 2017

Jacques Dubochet: EMBL; Joachim Frank: Columbia University; Richard Henderson: MRC; Background: © Martin Högbom/The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences

Jacques Dubochet (left), Joachim Frank (center), Richard Henderson (right) - Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry 2017

This year's Nobel Prizes were awarded to a total of nine scientists. The research areas that have been awarded and the prize winners at a glance:

Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine

The Nobel Committee at the Karolinska Institute has awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to the American scientists Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young for their work on the internal clock of living beings.

  • Jeffrey C. Hall was born 1945 in New York, USA. He received his doctoral degree in 1971 at the University of Washington in Seattle and was a postdoctoral fellow at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena from 1971 to 1973. He joined the faculty at Brandeis University in Waltham in 1974. In 2002, he became associated with University of Maine.
  • Michael Rosbash was born in 1944 in Kansas City, USA. He received his doctoral degree in 1970 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. During the following three years, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. Since 1974, he has been on faculty at Brandeis University in Waltham, USA.
  • Michael W. Young was born in 1949 in Miami, USA. He received his doctoral degree at the University of Texas in Austin in 1975. Between 1975 and 1977, he was a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University in Palo Alto. From 1978, he has been on faculty at the Rockefeller University in New York

Nobel Prize in Physics

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences honours the American scientists Rainer Weiss, Barry C. Barish and Kip S. Thorne for their achievements in detecting gravitational waves.

  • Rainer Weiss, born 1932 in Berlin, Germany. Ph.D. 1962 from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA. Professor of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA.
  • Barry C. Barish, born 1936 in Omaha, NE, USA. Ph.D. 1962 from University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA. Linde Professor of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA
  • Kip S. Thorne, born 1940 in Logan, UT, USA. Ph.D. 1965 from Princeton University, NJ, USA. Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA

Nobel Prize in Chemistry

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences honours the scientists Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson for the development of cryoelectron microscopy.

  • Jacques Dubochet, born 1942 in Aigle, Switzerland. Ph.D. 1973, University of Geneva and University of Basel, Switzerland. Honorary Professor of Biophysics, University of Lausanne, Switzerland.
  • Joachim Frank, born 1940 in Siegen, Germany. Ph.D. 1970, Technical University of Munich, Germany. Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics and of Biological Sciences, Columbia University, New York, USA.
  • Richard Henderson, born 1945 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Ph.D. 1969, Cambridge University, UK. Programme Leader, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK.
Facts, background information, dossiers
  • Nobel prize
  • Nobel Prize for Chemistry
  • Nobel Prize for Physics
  • Nobel Prize in Phys…
  • Jeffrey C. Hall
  • Michael Rosbash
  • Michael W. Young
  • Rainer Weiss
  • Barry C. Barish
  • Kip S. Thorne
  • circadian clock
  • chronobiology
  • physics
  • astrophysics
  • cryo-electron microscopy
  • Richard Henderson
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