30-Jul-2014 - QIAGEN N.V.

QIAGEN adds promising genomic biomarkers to pipeline

Mutations of SF3B1 gene indicate favorable prognosis for patients with bone marrow disorders

QIAGEN N.V. announced it has acquired an exclusive global license to the biomarker SF3B1 from the University of Tokyo. SF3B1 is believed to play a critical role in the prognosis of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a group of hematological cancers in which bone marrow does not produce enough healthy blood cells. Mutations of this gene, which is an important component of the spliceosome machinery, indicate a more favorable disease progression for patients than the “wild-type” gene, so testing for these gene variants could potentially provide important guidance for treatment based on a personalized healthcare approach to MDS.

"This novel biomarker adds important content to QIAGEN’s market-leading position in molecular tests for blood cancers. Our assays and panels cover the full range of these malignancies, including the bone marrow failure disorders known as myelodisplastic disorders. The SF3B1 biomarker is included in our GeneReadTM DNAseq Leukemia V2 gene panel for next-generation sequencing," said Vincent Fert, QIAGEN’s Personalized Healthcare Program Leader. “Building on a broad portfolio of molecular diagnostics for blood cancers, QIAGEN continues to partner with clinical researchers at pharmaceutical companies and academic centers, to extend the benefits of personalized healthcare. Because several Pharma companies are developing potential anti-cancer drugs targeting the SF3B1 gene, this biomarker also holds potential for co-development as a companion diagnostic.”

QIAGEN licensed the SF3B1 biomarker in an ongoing expansion of the oncohematology offering for clinical research and diagnostics. Three additional spliceosome biomarkers implicated in various blood cancers and targeting variants in the U2AF35 (U2AF1), ZRSR2 and SFRS2 genes are also part of the license agreement.

Facts, background information, dossiers
  • University of Tokyo
  • spliceosome
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