A diamond radio receiver

Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have made the world’s smallest radio receiver – built out of an assembly of atomic-scale defects in pink diamonds. This tiny radio — whose building blocks are the size of two atoms — can withstand extremely harsh environments and is biocompatible, meaning it could work anywhere from a probe on Venus to a pacemaker in a human heart.

Topics:
  • engineering
  • radio waves
  • diamonds
  • quantum computing
  • electromagnetic fields
  • pacemaker

Harvard University

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