Alternative water detection with easyH2O

Selective and chemical-free

In order to guarantee the high quality of raw materials and end products determination of the water content is of critical importance in many industries. By dispensing with toxic or special reagents the Berghof easyH2O one constitutes an alternative to the conventional Karl Fischer titration method.

EasyH2O one combines the thermal evaporation of water with a selective, electrochemical water sensor to produce a new and innovative procedure for water determination. The water is evaporated from the sample in a programmable oven and conveyed to the sensor in a stream of carrier gas. The coulometric P2O5 sensor absorbs the water and electrolyses it immediately. The charge quantity required is proportional to the amount of water and is established using Faraday’s Law. The sensor is thus self-regenerating and is always ready for use. The whole process is controlled by software and runs automatically. No special or toxic chemicals are required to operate the system.

Users benefit from:

  • reduced operating and disposal costs
  • operating personnel do not need to be specially trained
  • reduced blank value entry
  • distinction between different bonding forms of the water

Achieving success faster
We use workshops and individual demonstrations to convey the necessary know-how, while a network of trained specialist dealers and the provision of a technical service ensure that we are able to offer rapid assistance with any questions you may have. We look forward to hearing from you.

For further information please visit our product website, download our product brochure or request information now!


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