11 Current news of University of Michigan


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Smart gas sensors for better chemical detection


Portable gas sensors can allow you to search for explosives, diagnose medical conditions through a patient's breath, and decide whether it's safe to stay in a mine. These devices do all this by identifying and measuring airborne chemicals, and a new, more sensitive, smart model is under ...


Vitamins doing gymnastics: Scientists capture first full image of vitamin B12 in action

Work by University of Michigan and MIT team yields new understanding of crucial reaction in the body and in CO2-scrubbing bacteria


You see it listed on the side of your cereal box and your multivitamin bottle. It's vitamin B12, part of a nutritious diet like all those other vitamins and minerals. But when it gets inside your body, new research suggests, B12 turns into a gymnast.In a paper published in Nature, scientists from ...


Nerve gas litmus test could sense airborne chemical weapons


Nerve gases are colorless, odorless, tasteless and deadly. While today's soldiers carry masks and other protective gear, they don't have reliable ways of knowing when they need them in time. That could change, thanks to a new litmus-like paper sensor made at the University of Michigan.The paper ...


Genes linked to cancer could be easier to detect with liquid lasers


Using a liquid laser, University of Michigan researchers have developed a better way to detect the slight genetic mutations that might predispose a person to a particular type of cancer or other diseases. Their results are published in Angewandte Chemie. This work could advance understanding of ...


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New insights into how stem cells determine what tissue to become


Within 24 hours of culturing adult human stem cells on a new type of matrix, University of Michigan researchers were able to make predictions about how the cells would differentiate, or what type of tissue they would become. Their results are published in the Aug. 1 edition of Nature ...


Paper strips can quickly detect toxin in drinking water


A strip of paper infused with carbon nanotubes can quickly and inexpensively detect a toxin produced by algae in drinking water. Engineers at the University of Michigan led the development of the new biosensor. The paper strips perform 28 times faster than the complicated method most commonly ...


Music is the engine of new U-M lab-on-a-chip device


Music, rather than electromechanical valves, can drive experimental samples through a lab-on-a-chip in a new system developed at the University of Michigan. This development could significantly simplify the process of conducting experiments in microfluidic devices. A lab-on-a-chip, or ...


New nanoporous material has highest surface area yet


University of Michigan researchers have developed a nanoporous material with a surface area significantly higher than that of any other porous material reported to date. "Surface area is an important, intrinsic property that can affect the behavior of materials in processes ranging from the ...


U-M researchers discover new genes that fuse in cancer


Using new technologies that make it easier to sequence the human genome, researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a series of genes that become fused when their chromosomes trade places with each other. These recurrent gene fusions are thought to be ...


New research shows why metal alloys degrade


Metal alloys can fail unexpectedly in a wide range of applications - from jet engines to satellites to cell phones - and new research from the University of Michigan helps to explain why. Metal alloys are solids made from at least two different metallic elements. The elements are often mixed ...


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