New Research Center to Focus on Mammalian Single Cell Genomics

01-06-2012: The Broad Institute and Fluidigm Corporation have announced the launch of a new research center dedicated to accelerating the development of research methods and discoveries in mammalian single-cell genomics. The Single-Cell Genomics Center is also expected to act as a hub for collaboration among single-cell genomics researchers in many pioneering fields, including stem cells and cancer biology.

The Center will be housed at the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts and will feature a complete suite of Fluidigm single-cell tools, protocols and technologies. The Center grew out of ongoing collaborations between the Broad Institute and Fluidigm that bridge multiple genomic platforms.

"With the Single-Cell Genomics Center, we will enable researchers to access the exciting new world of single-cell genomics, catalyze discoveries and advance our understanding of this important area of biology," said Wendy Winckler, Ph.D., Director of the Genetic Analysis Platform at the Broad Institute.

"The cell is the fundamental unit of life, and through greater understanding of it, researchers can make breakthroughs in large and important fields, such as cancer diagnosis and therapy, stem cell biology, vaccine development, and even the mounting battle against drug-resistant bacteria. We expect this center to inspire, enable and accelerate efforts in the emerging field of single-cell research," said Gajus Worthington, President and Chief Executive Officer of Fluidigm.

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